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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
before it did so in july, those talks were not necessarily very good. so, just because they're talking doesn't necessarily mean that they're agreeing. >> now, in the last few days we've shown you a lot of pictures like this, but at least 15 people are now reported to have died in the severe winter storms in the u.s. blizzards have caused power cuts and southern and midwestern states, hundreds of flights have been canceled as well. >> the united states is used to bad winter weather, but when it's this deep, there's only one thing to do. break out the shovel and get digging. this is syracuse in new york state. but extreme weather has brought disruption right across the country. tornadoes were starked in texas, louisiana, alabama and mississippi. 200,000 people were left without power and emergencies have been declared in two states. >> we had a most unfortunate event. storm, tornado storm, pretty much ravaged a lot of our business community and residential community. >> most of those who died were involved in road accidents. the falling trees also killed some. now the storms moved on and
and cabinet in july 1962 great tapes include numerous discussions on topics of the day, including the q1 missile crisis in vietnam. this is about one hour. >> good evening, ladies and gentlemen. i am tommy nottingham the director of the jfk library foundation. tom putnam is the director of the presidential museum and i thank you all for coming here this evening. let me begin by acknowledging generous underwriters of the kennedy form, bank of america, boston capital, global institute, the boston foundation, and the media partners. tonight's forum is a very special one for those who work at the john f. kennedy library and the same. the publication of the "listening in", which is now on sale in our museum store, was simply not possible if not for the incredible skills and talent and professionalism and dedication of our library staff and government employees. there is one person in particular, one person that tom putnam and i would like to acknowledge. and it isn't archivist that has been overseeing the classification of these recordings and who knows more about these 265 hours of president
a bill exactly like this sitting in the united states senate. harry reid passed it back in july, and republicans refused to vote on it. boehner, why don't you vote on that? the time for complaining about this deal, totally over. >> nobody can get 100% of what they want, and this is not simply a contest between parties in terms of who looks good and who doesn't. >> don't you think republicans need to be careful about pushing back on this for the good of the country? if no deal is struck this year, president obama, what does he have? well, he's got the inauguration coming up. a big platform. he's got the state of the union address coming up. a big platform. he is going to have a better chance to have the american people on his side. president obama urged all members of congress to get some perspective over the holiday weekend on this. >> everybody can cool off. everybody can drink some eggnog, have some christmas cookies, sing some christmas carols, enjoy the company of loved ones, and then i'd ask every member of congress while they're back home to think about that. think about t
experience. i've also visited libya -- >> in july? >> i visited in july but i also visited in september after the attack on benghazi. so i can speak to my own experience. you know, went secretary clinton said all of his senior leaders in the department are accountable and responsible for what happened at it certainly felt myself. ihop the remains of my former colleagues back after the attack in benghazi. had been in the middle east on a trip and cut short to come back with them. and all that long flight home i certainly have a lot of time to think about sharper questions that i could've asked, sharper focus that i could have provided. spent on your visit in july or september, did you -- >> july, yes. >> did that issue come up? did the folks on the ground say to you we are really worried about what's happening here with security? we've made a number of requests? >> there was no specific question about that. i did talk to ambassador stevens about the security situation but we didn't talk about specifics at the time. >> secretary clinton met with the prime minister in march with -- you know if t
by leaders. some of which have changed the course of history -- for better and some for worse. july 1776, the american founding fathers' decision to declare independence. january 1863, abraham lincoln's decision to emancipate all persons held as slaves. june 1941, adolph hitler's decision to invade the soviet union. august 1945, president truman's decision to use an atomic bomb against japan. tonight we'll examine the process of making a tough decision. we'll hear about major decisions on an international stage, about corporate decisions, and personal ones. from taking down the most wanted man in the world -- >> the president turned to us and said, i made my decision. we are going to go with the raid. write up the orders. >> -- to giving up a dream career. >> it was this sense of almost unreality, of just -- i'm not sure i know who i am. >> to uprooting a company culture. >> some people actually quit. >> to opening the door to a closed society. >> this is like a spy thriller. >> absolutely. >> each of my guests has wrestled with a difficult choice. they will take us through their deliber
're doing a little bit. >> yeah. so this was not a happy afternoon. this was fourth of july weekend a couple of years ago, and one of our board members at interfaith youth corps is director at mcends si and company. and he had said to me, you know, let's do a pro bono assessment of how this organization has been doing over the first eight years of its existence, and i was like, you know with, great. spend your mcends si money and tell us how great we're doing, right? and i didn't know that's not how consulting generally works. so my wife had promised as we're heading up to ta reck's house july 4th weekend, she's like no shoptalk. and i'm like, you know, who's talking shop? we're just going to have a great time looking out over the lake and enjoying steaks. so he looks at me, and he's like so i'm getting some of the data back from our assessment of interfaith youth corps, and i was like, yeah? and he's like, yeah. it's not going so great. and i'm like, come again? it's not going so great. i'm like, what are you talking about? i also didn't know how concrete consultants can get. he's like, wel
stonewall talks in july. speaking reuters, an nra spokesperson said the massacre in newtown, connecticut will not change their opposition to the treaty saying, "we are as opposed to it today as we were when it first appeared." the nra has vowed to oppose global arms regulation marking its second major policy announcement in the past week after responding to the newtown massacre with the karl for armed guards and by u.s. schools. some 200 teachers and utah attended a seminar sponsored by the pro-gun utah shooting sports council for free trading on the handling of firearms. new figures show publicly known u.s. drone strikes declined in pakistan this year while drastically increasing in yemen. according to the new america foundation, confirmed drone attacks fell to 46 from 72 in pakistan, while rising to 53 from 18 in yemen. the u.s. just recently admitted responsibility for a september attack in yemen that killed 11 civilians, including three children. rebels of the central african republic appeared to be on the verge of seizing control of the capital after taking at least 10 other towns.
the granddaughters would carry his torch. so suzanne, i hope i'm sitting on the couch with you again on july 18th for his 95th birthday. >> that would be very nice. i would certainly hope that happens. nadia, thank you very much. i appreciate it. and if you want to see more, tune into cnn's "early start weekend" for nadia's full interview with mandela's granddaughters. that's tomorrow at 6:00 a.m. eastern. >>> and u.s. army general whose temper earned him the name stormin' norman has died. general norman schwarzkopf was one of the most celebrated leaders in the post-vietnam era. he led forces in kuwait after "operation desert storm." the retired general died yesterday in tampa, florida. president obama says the country has lost an american original. he was 78 years old. >>> in the philippines, at least 11 people are dead after a tropical cyclone slammed the central part of the country. the storm brought heavy flooding, landslides as well. two people are still missing. now, earlier this month, more than 1,000 died when a typhoon swept through that very same area. >>> the florida man known as the d
that vote back on july 25th, the democratic bill is, quote, a revenue measure that didn't originate in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal is i said at that time was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster. and the democrats were really serious, they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called nate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution. so let's put that convenient talking point aside from here on out. last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here and, as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american peop
fell this month to the lowest point since july. and wall street gave ground today on worries about the lack of a budget deal in washington. the dow jones industrial average lost almost 121 points to close near 13,190. the nasdaq fell 29 points to close at 3,021. for the week, the dow gained about half a percent; the nasdaq rose 1.7%. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we return to the aftermath of the shootings in newtown, connecticut, a week ago today. ray suarez begins our coverage of the latest developments. >> suarez: a cold rain fell this morning in newtown, connecticut, as townspeople and officials gathered at city hall for a moment of silence. at 9:30, a bell rang 26 times, once for each of the 20 children and six adults killed one week ago at sandy hook elementary school. mourners also gathered again at funerals and at makeshift memorials. >> i feel as though the first few days after this happened was really a feeling of numbness and shock. but now that's lifting a little bit and the reality is setting in, and it's very, very pain
what you're doing. >> this was not a happy afternoon. this was fourth of july weekend a couple of years ago. .. >> i said, what are you talking about? i didn't know how concrete consultants can get sometimes. he said when you speak at a college campus on the people really like speakers, the three months, six months, nine months or 12 months later, they are not really taking action. and i said, you know, this does not sound great. that he doesn't -- instead, actually, i have a theory about this, and i said, what is your theory? he said my theory is it's your fault. [laughter] so i kind of wish i hadn't asked that question. he said the problem, eboo patel, is when you talk about interfaith cooperation from you talk about many different things. people can't and won't do a hundred different things. you have to be able to articulate an aspirational vision of this and we did people take action. and not measure your effectiveness by the applause after speeches. effectiveness is interfaith cooperation and how many people are becoming interfaith leaders, starting their own interfaith programs on
as a public service by your television provider. -- julie watches c-span on verizon. washington journal continues. host: joining us on indianapolis is doug wissing, author of "funding and the enemy." we are talking about afghanistan and the end game. first, the title of your book that you wrote this year, how u.s. taxpayers bankrolled the taliban, remind us of what you were right thing? -- were writing. guest: i am sorry. i'm getting feedback in my earphone. if you could come off my audio, thank you. when i was imbedded with u.s. soldiers in afghanistan, i began to realize that the soldiers were trying to explain to me that there was a toxics system that was connecting distracted american officials, -- i'm sorry, i'm back to getting this in my ear phone. host: we will see if they can fix it. if you can try to continue, we will try to fix it. guest: there was a toxic network, hearing myself twice simply does not work. there was a toxic network that was connecting distracted american officials, u.s. corporations, military- industrial and development and industrial complex corporations, co
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)